Anne McLaren | Biography | Education | Research | Death

Anne McLaren | Biography | Education | Research | Death

Dame Anne McLaren, DBE, FRS (26 April 1927 – 7 July 2007) was a British developmental biologist and embryologist.

She was born in London, England and studied at the University of Cambridge, where she later worked as a researcher and professor. McLaren made significant contributions to the field of developmental biology, particularly in the area of mammalian development and the early stages of embryonic growth. She was also a prominent advocate for the ethical use of animals in scientific research.

Education:

McLaren received her undergraduate degree in natural sciences from the University of Cambridge in 1948 and her PhD in 1951. She then worked as a researcher at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford before becoming a professor at the University of Edinburgh in 1970. In 1980, she returned to Cambridge as a professor of biology.

Research:

McLaren's research focused on the early stages of mammalian development and the mechanisms that control embryonic growth. She made significant contributions to the understanding of the role of hormones in embryonic development, and her work on the use of in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques laid the foundation for the development of human IVF. She also helped establish the UK's first IVF clinic at the Bourn Hall Clinic.

McLaren was a strong advocate for the ethical use of animals in scientific research and served on numerous committees and boards in this capacity, including the Animal Procedures Committee and the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.

 ResearchGate Anne McLaren and Donald Michie visiting Milan Hašek's department

Awards:

McLaren was awarded numerous honors and awards throughout her career, including being made a dame in 1991 and receiving the Royal Society's Royal Medal in 2002. She passed away in 2007.

Anne McLaren Background:

She was the daughter of Henry McLaren, 2nd Baron Aberconway and Mary, Baroness Aberconway. Her father was a businessman and politician, and her mother was a botanist and suffragist.

McLaren was the eldest of three children. She had a younger brother and sister, Charles and Mary. Her family was well-educated and politically active, and her parents were both prominent figures in British society.

McLaren was educated at St Paul's Girls' School in London and then went on to study natural sciences at the University of Cambridge, where she received her undergraduate degree in 1948. After completing her PhD at Cambridge in 1951, she began her career as a researcher in the field of developmental biology.

McLaren never married and had no children. She dedicated her life to her scientific research and career and was recognized for her contributions to the field of developmental biology and IVF with many prestigious awards and honors throughout her lifetime.

McLaren passed away on July 7, 2007, at the age of 80. She was remembered by her colleagues and peers as a pioneering scientist and a dedicated advocate for the ethical use of animals in scientific research.

Anne Mclaren research about in-vitro fertilisation (IVF)

Anne McLaren made significant contributions to the field of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) through her research on the early stages of mammalian development and the mechanisms that control embryonic growth. She helped to establish the UK's first IVF clinic at the Bourn Hall Clinic, which opened in 1980.

One of her most notable contributions to IVF was her research on the use of hormones to control the growth and development of embryos in the lab. She discovered that by supplementing the culture medium with hormones, embryos could be grown in the lab for longer periods of time, allowing for more research to be conducted on their development. This was a major breakthrough that laid the foundation for the development of human IVF.

McLaren also made key contributions to the understanding of the role of genetics in IVF. Her research helped to identify the genetic factors that determine the success or failure of IVF and provided insights into the causes of infertility.

In addition to her laboratory research, McLaren was also an advocate for the ethical use of animals in scientific research. She served on numerous committees and boards in this capacity, including the Animal Procedures Committee and the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. She was also a proponent of using non-animal alternatives in research, such as in-vitro culture systems, in order to reduce the use of animals in scientific research.

Overall, Anne McLaren's research on IVF contributed significantly to the development of the IVF treatment, the understanding of the causes of infertility, and the ethical use of animals in scientific research.

Anne McLaren Death

Dame Anne McLaren passed away on July 7, 2007, at the age of 80. The cause of her death is not publicly disclosed.

McLaren's death was widely mourned by her colleagues and peers in the scientific community, as she was a highly respected and accomplished scientist. She had made significant contributions to the field of developmental biology, particularly in the area of mammalian development and the early stages of embryonic growth. Her work on in vitro fertilization (IVF) also laid the foundation for the development of human IVF.

Her death was also recognized for her contributions to the ethical use of animals in scientific research, she served on numerous committees and boards in this capacity, including the Animal Procedures Committee and the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.

McLaren was awarded numerous honors and awards throughout her career, including being made a Dame in 1991 and receiving the Royal Society's Royal Medal in 2002. Her death was a loss to the scientific community and her legacy continues through her research and her influence on the field.

 

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